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‘I have faith in ministers’ – Ramaphosa on no-confidence vote



President Cyril Ramaphosa tried to denounce the DA’s no-confidence vote against his cabinet and tell MPs that he had a dedicated team of ministers.

The president delivered his address in response to the State of the Nation (Sona) debate that took place over the past two days.

DA leader John Steenhuisen criticized Ramaphosa’s “deadbeat ministers” on Tuesday, urging the president to fire them all for failing to do their job and deliver to South Africans.

“I have just tabled a vote of no confidence, not in you, but in your entire cabinet within the meaning of Article 102 of the Constitution.

“If you can’t hold your executive accountable and still survive as president, we’ll take that burden off your hands and let this House fire them for you,” Steenhuisen says.

Ramaphosa denied Steenhuisen’s claim that the cabinet was bloated and inept.

“I preside over ministers who are committed to their responsibilities and in whom I have the greatest confidence as President… and more importantly, in whom South Africans have confidence and expectations.”

ALSO READ: DA files no-confidence vote against Ramaphosa’s entire cabinet

Ramaphosa denied MPs’ feelings that he was creating a “parallel state” by hiring outsiders into his office to help with government work, but said the government was instead building a “capable development state alongside a vibrant private sector” to create a ​create a mixed economy.

“It is not a parallel state that some say is being set up. It is a presidency that is working to develop a coherent and effective plan of action for the entire government,” he said.

“This is a government elected by the people and remains united around a common purpose that will not be distracted or distracted from its common purpose.”

Private sector provided most jobs

following a uproar from EFF leader Julius Malema over his Sona comments that the private sector creates jobs and not the government, Ramaphosa appeared to have modified his statement in Wednesday’s speech.

The private sector, he said, has created “the most” jobs.

“This has sparked a useful debate in society about the role of the state and the private sector in economic growth and job creation. Some speakers took a crude and selfish approach to a complex issue.

“Who will create jobs for the 11 million unemployed in our country? The state has a clear role to play through state-owned enterprises, public employment programs, infrastructure development and the civil service. The harsh reality is that the private sector creates the most jobs.”

Referring to China’s economic model that combines private and public sector initiatives, Ramaphosa said the government’s plan was to entice the private sector into job creation programs so that it can invest its money in various projects to boost economic growth. achieve growth.

“We therefore do not accept that we choose between a developing state that stimulates economic and social transformation and a vibrant expanding private sector that stimulates growth.

“We do not agree that by recognizing the role of business in job creation, we are diminishing the central role of the state in coordinating, planning and guiding the development of the economy,” Ramaphosa told the MPs.

The president made a comment about his Sona announcements about cutting bureaucracy that hinders SME growth, defended the appointment of former Exxaro CEO Sipho Nkosi† Opposition parties said the latest nomination to the presidency signaled Ramaphosa’s lack of confidence in his cabinet to do his job.

Similar decisions were made by other governments, he said.

“The red tape restricts South Africans in their daily lives. People wait years for things like getting a water permit because of bureaucracy endemic to our government system. I’ve heard the Western Cape has a bureaucracy… we’ll be able to compare notes. We are already comparing notes with what is happening in other countries.”

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